Chromium

Chromium is a mineral that assists in the body’s ability to use insulin to convert carbohydrates to energy.  Although unverified conclusively, there are some claims that taking chromium supplements will help treat diabetes, heart disease and obesity.

The amount of chromium that we require in our bodies is very small.  A healthy adult needs from 20 to 35 mcg of chromium per day, depending on age and gender.  Adequate intake for pregnant or breastfeeding women is between 29 and 45 mcg per day.  Exact amounts of chromium found in foods are not established, but estimates are available, according to the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements.

Therefore, there is enough chromium found in food and supplementation isn’t really necessary for most people.  Consult a health care professional if you’re worried about chromium intake and are considering supplementation.

Foods that provide our bodies chromium include:

Fruits and Vegetables

Grain Products (eating bread or waffles with honey, syrup, jelly or other toppings that are high in sugar may counteract the health benefits of chromium)

                Asparagus

                Bagels

                Broccoli

                Muffins

                Mushrooms

                Waffles

                Potatoes

                Whole Grain Bread

                Green Beans

                Grain Cereals

                Apples

                Bananas

Meats

                Prunes

                Beef

                Turkey breast

Additional Foods

                Calf Liver

                Black pepper

                Organ Meats

                Thyme

                Brewer’s yeast

Note:  If you are deficient in chromium it can cause unstable blood glucose levels and elevated levels of triglycerides, fats that can increase your risk for heart disease. Chromium generally produces few side effects when you consume it through food. Beware of the dietary supplement chromium picolinate which may cause low blood sugar and health complications if taken at high doses.

References and further information:

University of Maryland Medical Center

Live Strong.com

Gary

About Gary

I am retired, but not tired. I still want to be valuable to others. I know that others are valuable to me. After looking back on six decades, I have asked myself this question: “What do I believe?” My mind filled up. My heart started beating faster. My spirit soared. I post blogs to share what my mind is working on, what my heart believes would help others and, what my spirit is communicating to me. What do I believe, you ask? Decisions dictate your path In love, not hate In tolerance, not prejudice In health, not sickness In wealth, not poverty In kindness, rudeness In happiness, not sadness In encouragement, not discouragement In faith, not doubt In courage, not fear I have been and will be challenged in each one of these beliefs, but the biggest belief is to stay positive and not turn negative. This belief helps me maintain all of the others.

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